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August 27, 2017

Healthy Boundaries, Healthy Relationships (3). True Freedom in Relationships

While we are all free to make our own choices, our choices are not free of consequences. In Part 3 of Healthy Boundaries, Healthy Relationships, Rev. Jeremiah Cheung says that God calls us to live in unity and explains that we can achieve it … provided we make the right choices.


The Book of Ephesians contains six chapters: The first three chapters discuss doctrine while the latter three chapters focus on the application of the truths. In other words, chapters 1 to 3 talk about what God has done for us, while chapters 4 to 6 discuss what we are to do for God.

In Chapter 4, the first verse contains the word “then” — “As a prisoner of the Lord, then, I urge you to live a life worthy of the calling you have received. Be completely humble and gentle; be patient, bearing with one another in love. Make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.”

The main point of this passage is this: “make every effort to keep the unity of the Spirit through the bond of peace.” We are to do our best to maintain this unity. Unity is God’s will.

There is a special revelation in the Bible: 1-2-1. The process of one becoming two is called ‘separation’ and then two becoming one is called ‘unity.” How then do we maintain unity? There are two ways people deal with interpersonal relationships: first via blaming and control and second through power and love.


Sermon Notes

1. Blaming and Control vs. __________________

2. Where are the Distinctions?
a. Distinct in __________
b. Distinct in __________
c. Distinct in __________


Discussion Questions

1. There is a special revelation in the Bible: 1-2-1. We call the process of one becoming two ‘separation.” The process of two becoming one, we call `unity’. How can unity be maintained?

2. There are two ways people deal with interpersonal relationships: one is through blaming and control; the second is through power and love. Which of these two were used in your family when you were growing up? In your own family today, which one do you use? Why?

3. There are three areas of distinction between blaming & control and power & love: distinction in power, distinction in motives, and distinction in response. Can you point out how they differ in these aspects?

4. In these three areas of distinction, which area do you find most difficult? What do you need to do to improve in this aspect?